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Track - Sprint Workout Routines

By: anonymous
This article is for coaches and athletes at all levels who participate in track events, and/or have goals of increasing their top speed and acceleration. This is a good workout routine for 100m and 200m athletes, but also as speed work for 400m and 800m runners. About eating before or after the workouts; I say that you should have your muscles filled with glycogen before you do the sprints. This is done by doing a carb load meal several hours before the workout, or a carb load meal(s) the day before. But don't actually eat carbs immediately before the workout. Carb loads should be at least 2 hours before the workout. This is to make sure GH gets secreted during the workout, then about 30-60 minutes after the workout eat up!

WORKOUT #1
This is a week long workout routine for any sprinter, and a good "kick workout" for middle-distance runners early in the season to give them a good understanding of their top speed potential. Workouts #1.1, and 1.4 are designed to increase top speed, while workout #1.2 is designed to extend and strengthen the muscle, core, and lung endurance, along with the runners stride.

Workout #1.1
(number of reps x meters of distance)
To keep the workout efficient, the workout should be done from a standing start. Athletes should coast to a stop (approximately 30meters beyond the "finish line") and avoid coming to an abrupt stop. Walk to the start (either back to original start or toward the next 1,2,3,400m start). Recovery should be full recovery. 1 - 1:30 minutes should be sufficient recovery between reps, with 2 - 3 minute recovery with each distance change. Try not to exceed these recovery times but remember: This is about the quality of the work. These are all to be done at 100% effort, and continually striving to find a faster speed even as the distance lengthens. DON'T compromise quality to keep up with the workout. Monitor your athletes to determine if the workout needs to be shortened. This workout should take about one hour plus warming up and a cooldown jog and stretch.
Mon. - 5x20m, 4x30m, 3x40m
3x30m, 3x40m, 2x50m, 1x60m
5x30m (all at top speed)


Workout 1.2
This workout is designed to strengthen and extend the stride, and is performed the day after the highest intensity workout, to remind the athlete of the speed capability of their facility while extending the distance. It is key to be properly warmed up going into this workout. You will be running on sore muscles from the 1.1workout. Now its time to put your lungs through the same battery. This workout should be run at the intensity of the 1.1workout for the initial 60m, and then settling in to a powerful formed run following the initial drive phase.
Tues. - 6 x 250m (34 28 @ 200) 2 min rest (pace times are equivalent to 2:15 - 1:52 for 800m, 65 - 54sec for 400m, and 27 - 23sec 200m)
(optional alternative, 200m and up) - 300 200 100 (39 26 13) 100 walk rest between reps. (2-3 sets) 400 walk rest between sets
(optional alternative, 400m and up) - 3 x 500 (500 walk rest)
(optional alternative, 400m and up) - 500 400 300 200 (walk what you ran for rest)


Workout 1.3
Wed. - Recovery stretches, strides, and drills

Workout 1.4
Thurs. - 4 x 100 (25 sec rest) 2 sets (full recovery between)
(optional alternative, 100m and up) - Run 100m (walk back 50) Run 100m (cover full lap)
(optional alternative, 200m and up) - 200m (30 sec rest) 200m
(optional alternative, 300m and up) - 2 x 352 (full effort) full recovery


Workout 1.5
Fri. - Recovery stretches, strides, and drills

The intensity and times of these runs will be determined by the target times for your athletes.



WORKOUT #2 (400m)
This is a week long workout routine for longer sprints and middle-distance runners early in the season to give them a good understanding of their top speed potential. Workouts #2.1, and 2.4 are designed to increase top speed, while workout #1.2 is designed to extend and strengthen the muscle, core, and lung endurance, along with the runners stride.

Workout 2.1
Mon. - 5x20m, 4x30m, 3x40m
3x30m, 3x40m, 2x50m, 1x60m
5x30m (all at top speed)


Workout 2.2
Tues. - 6 x 250 (34 27 @ 200) 2 min rest
(optional alternative, 400m and up) - 300 (45 sec rest) 300 (3 sets)
(optional alternative, 400m and up) - 350 (60 sec rest) 350 (3 sets)
(optional alternative, 400m and up) - 3 x 500 (500 walk rest)
(optional alternative, 400m and up) - 600 500 400 300 200 (walk what you ran for rest)


Workout 2.3
Wed. - Recovery stretches, strides, and drills

Workout 2.4
Thurs. - 4 x 100 (25 sec rest) 2 sets (full recovery between)
200 (30 sec rest) 200 2 sets (full recovery between)
250 (40 sec rest) 150 2 sets (full recovery between)
300 (45 sec rest) 100 2 sets (full recovery between)
2 x 352 (full effort) full recovery between


Workout 2.5
Wed. - Recovery stretches, strides, and drills

The intensity and times of these runs will be determined by the target times for your athletes.

WORKOUT #3

The following workout is for hurdlers, sprinters, middle-distance runners who run 400 meters and negative split 800 meter runners. For more on negative split 800 meter runners, go to the 800m race strategy page.

To be a sprinter, you have to train like a sprinter. You should work on the areas that improve and develop the phases of sprinting. This may seem like an obvious statement but, it is essential. As a coach, and as an athlete, you must commit to maximizing the effort you put into each phase of sprinting. For a breakdown of the Essential Phases of Sprinting; Click here.

Your first priority should be to work on your sprinting technique on a daily basis. This includes the warm-up, phases of sprinting: the start, acceleration, transition, maximum speed, speed maintenance and finishing form. Working on the proper technique will eliminate any problems you are having. After technique, work on repetitions and strength, which includes weights and Plyometrics drills. For strength training refer to the web site under the "Coaching" button. Sprinters can use this same program. Follow the four-day cycle and start gradually. Regardless of the strength program you enter, or what primary sport or fitness goal you have, core training will be key in getting to that goal. For more on Core Training, click here.

You should have two types of warm-up routines. One is for workouts and the other is for competitions. Part of your warm-up should include technique.

A proper warm-up includes:
Jog at least 800 meters; flexibility (20 minutes); accelerations (10 meters, 20 meters, 30 meters, 40 meters) with progression of distance. Increase the workload week-by-week. Intensity and form are the intentions of the accelerations. The number of repetitions can be increased as your endurance increases. Remember, the intensity of the workout is the key. Be sure not to sacrifice increasing speed for quantity of reps.

Technique after the warm-up:
Always work on technique for 35-45 minutes (hurdlers work on hurdle technique; sprinters work on mechanic drills; baton & sprinting out of the blocks 2 days a week) After technique, work on repeats.

The following Periodization Program should be your preparation for track:
When you start repeats, start with 3 or 4 and work yourself up to your maximum repetitions and distance.

Saturdays and Sundays are rest days. Stay away from sprinting altogether. It is important that you get enough rest to recover.

General Preparation Period (Initial training/preseason training):
All workouts in the preparation period are done in good supportive running shoes and are never all out. Sprinting without first getting your body use to running can risk injury. You are working to learn tempo, form and how to run into curves and out of curves. Each week every workout will get a little bit faster, without straining. If you want to run fast 400's, you must learn the tempo of your goal time and get faster and faster without straining.

Monday:
Work on repetitions of 300-600 meters with complete rest between repetitions. Work on even pace. Workout a total of 1200 meters.

Tuesday:
Run Repeat Hills if available (start with 3 repeat hills the 1st week; work up to 6 repeat hills). Run 200 meters up a hill, working on good arm action and no straining. Always walk back down. Workout a total of 1200 meters.

Wednesday:
Work on repetitions of 80-150 meters. Start at the beginning of the straightway so you only have to run one curve. Each 150 meters gets faster. Keep walking between each 150 meters and do not sprint until you are ready. Workout a total of 900 meters.

Thursday: Same as Tuesday.

Friday: Work on sprints of 20-60 meters (Race Preparation for starts and finishing through the line)

Saturday: Competition

Sunday: Rest

Warm down regardless of the difficulty of the training workout.

Communicate from the very beginning what is expected in your "goal routine". This way there will be no surprises. Let them know the format and what they are working towards.

Sprinters will not be able to do this training routine in the beginning. This is your goal training routine. Training should be a gradual building process. Some days you will do warm up and technique work and you will be done for the day because the athletes will not be conditioned for a while. You will know when to increase the workload and progress by communicating with your athletes to find out how they are feeling.

Varying the workout load of your sprinters is a great idea, and in doing so you may uncover some hidden talents within your core group of your sprinters. During the season, especially early on, include competitive long jump, triple jump, high jump, shot, discus, javelin, and hammer workouts in place of, or onto the lower intensity workout days. You may be surprised at who can long jump, or throw the discus.

Special Preparation Period (race/event preparation):
It is important to set aside time to train your athletes in how to perform at the track and field event. At times, you may feel that you have to get in a certain amount of quality workouts to get your athletes up to the speed and goal times they have set for themselves. Don't worry about that. Sacrificing attention to goal times and splits to get your athletes into a proper pre-race routine or strategic plan is well worth it! This is essential for younger athletes that can continually take these lessons and good habits forward. Veteran runners can always use the extra attention to this also, and it will help them refocus their process. For more on race preparation, click here.

Monday: Choose One:
1. 2x500
2. 3x400's
3. 4x300's
4. 1x500, 1x400, 1x300


Each repetition must be faster. Work on Plyometrics (i.e. engaging your core, and quality knee lifts and driving of the arms and extending of the strides) on the areas that improve and develop the phases of sprinting.

Tuesday: Acceleration drills: (10 meters, 20 meters, 30 meters, 40 meters) progression of distance; week-by-week increase the workload; intensity can be increased; number of repetitions can be increased.

Week-by-week:
1. 10x10 meters (100m total)
2. Combine 10 and 20 meters (150m total)
3. 20 meters (160-200m total)
4. Combine 20 and 30 meters (200-250m total)
5. 30 meters (240-300m total)
6. Combine 30 and 40 meters (300m-350m total)
7. 40 meters (320-400m total)
8. Combination of all distance (320-500m total)
9. Repeat weekly increase starting at 30 meters, increasing to 70 meters.

Change the distance up the hill: 10x100 meters

Wednesday: Same as general preparation

Thursday: Same as Tuesday

Friday: Rest

Saturday: Competition

If you have a meet during the week, adjust workouts accordingly.

Competition Period:
Everything is the same as the Special Preparation Period: Two days a week work on start drills and relays. In training sessions decrease the distance, increase the intensity and decrease the repetitions. For more on the Competition Period, click here. Or go here for an overview for how to break down season into training periods.

 

 

 


 

 

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